Water and Food Desperation

environment, wildlife

Water and food shortages could lead to the worst possible scenario for humanity and wildlife.

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If we are not careful, we may soon find ourselves in a position where water supplies are in critical condition. This is because of a combination of natural disasters, population growth, and inefficient agricultural production. Water is the lifeblood of life on earth. Without it, there will be no food to eat and no way for the humanity/wildlife to survive.

Water is one of the world’s most precious natural resources. We cannot survive without it. With a minuscule number of the population using safe water on a daily basis, we are running out of it faster than we can replenish it. Water plays an important role in digestion, transport, manufacturing, and communication. There is also much that is hidden from view.

Much of the water that is used for our day-to-day purposes is wasted through improper use, contamination, and waste. The water we use for domestic use such as for drinking, washing, and cooking carries with it certain minerals that are beneficial to human health. These include calcium, magnesium, potassium, and phosphorus. However, there is a limit to how much of each mineral we can take. We must consume at least what we need and never use more than this limit.

In addition to these human consumption resources, water also plays an important role in the economy of countries. Water is the source of many human activities such as irrigation, farming, mining, construction, and transportation. On a macro scale, water serves a variety of purposes. For example, agriculture needs water to grow plants and trees, transportation needs it to travel, communication uses it for telecommunications, and manufacturing requires it to manufacture all the raw materials required. Without water, we would have little to do in all of these areas.

There are various ways by which humans get water. From rivers and lakes to water reserves in various countries, the human consumption of water supplies is increasing globally. There are many reasons why more people than ever before are trying to get their hands on higher ground water. Among the reasons are the dearth of fresh water, the depletion of groundwater, and the depletion of the natural water reserves.

When there is a water shortage, human activities tend to stop. People literally starve because they simply cannot survive without food. It has become a very serious problem and it is affecting every country in the world. There are two major causes for water scarcity, natural, and human. Natural causes are earthquakes, volcanoes, El Nino, and other volcanic eruptions, drought, and rain stress.

Human activities are the cause of most water scarcity. Industrialization, farming, mining, farming, transportation, mining, and agricultural production have all led to over consumption and over usage of available water. All these water-intensive activities demand more land for cultivation. The result of this is desert areas, soil erosion, and other harmful effects on the environment that lead to water scarcity.

Even though global water resources are rapidly being depleted, it is possible to use new and innovative technologies to solve many water problems. Water can be harvested from artificial reservoirs, recharged through rainwater collection systems, and even treated to eliminate harmful chemicals. New types of water vehicles are being introduced to reduce air pollution caused by vehicle exhausts. Other methods such as carbon dioxide absorption and solar power generation are also being explored as effective solutions to water scarcity problems.

Although these may seem complicated or costly at first, these new technologies may hopefully make water shortages being a thing of the past.

Provided by Antonio Westley


Disclaimer: This article is meant to be seen as an overview of this subject and not a reflection of viewpoints or opinions as nothing is definitive. So, make sure to do your research and feel free to use this information at your own discretion.



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