Tracking Wildlife Migration Due to Climate Change

wildlife

Wildlife populations are closely monitored by satellites due to the fact that they are a source of information about environmental changes.

dog walking
dog walking (click here for original source image)

Satellites have been tracking the movements of animals for over 60 years and have learned how animals adapt to change, how fast or slow they can move and how long they can stay in one place. Tracking wildlife migration due to climate change shows us that certain animals can not keep up with the change in their environment and must move to find a different habitat to thrive in. Some species may already be in trouble in some areas while other animals may not show any signs of suffering at all. We just do not know which ones are which populations will suffer most during this recent warming trend.

Although warming trends cause many problems in nature, it is animals such as birds, insects, amphibians, and mammals which are directly affected by these changes. These types of wildlife reproduce differently and move around on land and in water more than other types of animals. The result is that they are very sensitive to changes in their environment and are at greater risk from climate change than most living things.

For example, at higher elevations in some habitats they have a very difficult time dealing with temperature change and rapid changes in humidity and temperatures. They must also be able to cope with sudden changes in their food supply due to expanding numbers of predators. If prey numbers increase rapidly then the rodents that live in the same food supply will also increase in number and this will aggravate the problem for the animals. They will have to eat more in order to keep up with the increased activity from both predators and prey. If they are unable to cope with the change in their environment they can become stressed and possibly perish.